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"It is illegal for women to go topless in most cities, yet you can buy a magazine of a woman without her top on at any 7-11 store. So, you can sell breasts, but you cannot wear breasts, in America."

-

Violet Rose (via c-icatrix)

This is one of my favorite quotes about sexualization/objectification vs autonomy of female bodies bc it’s so succinct

(via platonicsbeforeerotics)

WHY DO GIRLS COMPLAIN ABOUT OTHER GIRLS BEING “SLUTTY” OR “TRASHY” THEY ARE WEAKENING THE SISTERHOOD

color palettes; superbass (insp)

meloromantics:

bobthewitch:

Hate to break it, but this is more done by other women than men.
Guys are mostly differently awful.

there are mountains of research backing up the fact that advertisers and media prey on women’s insecurities
like the rest of media ]and the world, basically], the ad industry is run by men. so is the beauty industry [the ceo’s of elizabeth arden, l’oreal, ulta, revlon, paul mitchell, nars, the miss universe pageant and several others are men].
men are the driving force behind media that is toxic to women and they are the ones who profit off of it.
on the ground, it may appear that women are the ones doing this to each other. that is a result of internalized misogyny, which women at times perpetuate due to the pressure to perform in a patriarchal society.
but do not think for a moment that women are behind this entire industry. do not think that women are the reason for this, do not think that women profit off of this, and do not think that mothers want this for their daughters.

meloromantics:

bobthewitch:

Hate to break it, but this is more done by other women than men.

Guys are mostly differently awful.

  1. there are mountains of research backing up the fact that advertisers and media prey on women’s insecurities
  2. like the rest of media ]and the world, basically], the ad industry is run by men. so is the beauty industry [the ceo’s of elizabeth arden, l’oreal, ulta, revlon, paul mitchell, nars, the miss universe pageant and several others are men].

men are the driving force behind media that is toxic to women and they are the ones who profit off of it.

on the ground, it may appear that women are the ones doing this to each other. that is a result of internalized misogyny, which women at times perpetuate due to the pressure to perform in a patriarchal society.

but do not think for a moment that women are behind this entire industry. do not think that women are the reason for this, do not think that women profit off of this, and do not think that mothers want this for their daughters.

womanistgrrrlcollective:

Will There Be Justice For Jada?
TW: Rape 
Source: Think Progress
In an incident that shares several elements with the infamous Steubenville rape case that made national headlines last year, a 16-year-old girl from Texas says that photos of her unconscious body went viral online after she was drugged and raped at a party with her fellow high schoolers. But the victim isn’t backing down. She’s speaking out about what happened to her, telling her story to local press and asking to be identified as Jada.
After other teens started mocking her online — sharing images of themselves splayed out on the floor in the same pose as Jada’s unconscious body under the hashtag #jadapose — the victim decided to speak out. She sat down with local outlet KHOU 11 to tell her side. “I’m just angry,” Jada said.
According to Jada, she was invited to a party at a fellow high schooler’s house. The boy who was hosting the party gave her a drink that she believes was spiked with a drug that made her lose consciousness. She passed out and doesn’t remember what happened next. But then she started seeing evidence of her sexual assault circulated online, and some of her peers started texting her to ask her if she was okay.
Then, #jadapose started turning her rape into a joke. When the Houston Press reached out to one of the individuals who shared a popular #jadapose photo, he said that he didn’t personally know Jada and was simply “bored at 1 a.m. and decided to wake up my (Twitter timeline).”
Jada decided to share her name and her story with the press because she has nothing to hide anymore. “Everybody has already seen my face and my body,” she said, “but that’s not what I am and who I am.” Nonetheless, the social media firestorm has taken a toll on her. She says she now wants to be homeschooled.
“No one’s daughter deserved this,” her mother, who asked not to be identified by name, told KHOU 11 News. “No human being deserved this.”
Like Jada, the Steubenville rape victim found out about her assault on social media, after images of her peers dragging her unconscious body were posted on Instagram and Twitter. A video of her attackers laughing and joking about her victimization — saying she was “deader than Trayvon Martin” — horrified people across the nation who wondered why these boys thought violating someone’s consent was so funny. After the internet hacktivist group Anonymous got involved in the case, and started demanding justice for the Steubenville victim, much of the country started paying attention to the criminal proceedings in the tiny Ohio town.
But, while Steubenville certainly helped spark a national conversationabout issues related to rape culture, it’s worth remembering that it’s hardly the only egregious example of sexual assault, victimization, and cyberbullying. The increased awareness to the subject at the time didn’t change the fact that the majority of teens still don’t learn anything abouthealthy relationships or sexual consent, and most young girls actually think of sexual violence as normal. Cases like Jada’s are happening all across thecountry, often exacerbated by kids who think it’s funny to post about it on social media.
The Houston police is currently investigating Jada’s allegations, and no arrests have yet been made. The alleged perpetrator has denied that a sexual assault occurred, referring to Jada as a “hoe” who “snitched.”

womanistgrrrlcollective:

Will There Be Justice For Jada?

TW: Rape 

Source: Think Progress

In an incident that shares several elements with the infamous Steubenville rape case that made national headlines last year, a 16-year-old girl from Texas says that photos of her unconscious body went viral online after she was drugged and raped at a party with her fellow high schoolers. But the victim isn’t backing down. She’s speaking out about what happened to her, telling her story to local press and asking to be identified as Jada.

After other teens started mocking her online — sharing images of themselves splayed out on the floor in the same pose as Jada’s unconscious body under the hashtag #jadapose — the victim decided to speak out. She sat down with local outlet KHOU 11 to tell her side. “I’m just angry,” Jada said.

According to Jada, she was invited to a party at a fellow high schooler’s house. The boy who was hosting the party gave her a drink that she believes was spiked with a drug that made her lose consciousness. She passed out and doesn’t remember what happened next. But then she started seeing evidence of her sexual assault circulated online, and some of her peers started texting her to ask her if she was okay.

Then, #jadapose started turning her rape into a joke. When the Houston Press reached out to one of the individuals who shared a popular #jadapose photo, he said that he didn’t personally know Jada and was simply “bored at 1 a.m. and decided to wake up my (Twitter timeline).”

Jada decided to share her name and her story with the press because she has nothing to hide anymore. “Everybody has already seen my face and my body,” she said, “but that’s not what I am and who I am.” Nonetheless, the social media firestorm has taken a toll on her. She says she now wants to be homeschooled.

“No one’s daughter deserved this,” her mother, who asked not to be identified by name, told KHOU 11 News. “No human being deserved this.”

Like Jada, the Steubenville rape victim found out about her assault on social media, after images of her peers dragging her unconscious body were posted on Instagram and Twitter. A video of her attackers laughing and joking about her victimization — saying she was “deader than Trayvon Martin” — horrified people across the nation who wondered why these boys thought violating someone’s consent was so funny. After the internet hacktivist group Anonymous got involved in the case, and started demanding justice for the Steubenville victim, much of the country started paying attention to the criminal proceedings in the tiny Ohio town.

But, while Steubenville certainly helped spark a national conversationabout issues related to rape culture, it’s worth remembering that it’s hardly the only egregious example of sexual assault, victimization, and cyberbullying. The increased awareness to the subject at the time didn’t change the fact that the majority of teens still don’t learn anything abouthealthy relationships or sexual consent, and most young girls actually think of sexual violence as normal. Cases like Jada’s are happening all across thecountry, often exacerbated by kids who think it’s funny to post about it on social media.

The Houston police is currently investigating Jada’s allegations, and no arrests have yet been made. The alleged perpetrator has denied that a sexual assault occurred, referring to Jada as a “hoe” who “snitched.”

slutdust:

glowcloud:

hiphopfrightsplaque:

"We live in a world where losing your phone is more dramatic than losing your virginity"

Um ok but I don’t recall my virginity having 16 GB of memory with all my contacts, music, photos, calendars, and apps or costing over $200.

my phone is an expensive and important material object and not a useless social construct put in place to shame and commodify women

Plus I remember where I lost my virginity.

atane:

"Men’s Rights Activist" in action.

atane:

"Men’s Rights Activist" in action.

den-of-lions said: I was wondering what you're opinion was on people saying things like "consent is sexy" like I understand it's supposed to send a good message but I guess like I don't think consent should be "sexy" cause that trivializes it, like consent is completely and totally necessary, not "sexy" like I hate when boys think they get brownie points for saying that? Like you should always get consent don't reward yourself for not being a rapist?

politicalsexkitten:

Exactly what you just said.

Consent is fucking required. There’s nothing sexy about it.

"Now “tribal trends” are totally “in.” You can walk into any store in the mall and see “Native” imagery everywhere. As a Native person, when I look at them, I can’t help but remember the not-so-distant past when my people weren’t allowed, by law, to wear these things. It’s such a constant reminder of the colonial power structures still in place. Back in the day, white people had the power to take away our culture, and now they have the power to wear it however they see fit. These are our images, our cultural symbols, yet we are completely powerless to have control over them."

bevsi:

Less “your sexuality/body/race/gender, etc shouldn’t matter” and more “your sexuality/body/race/gender should always be respected”
Don’t equate refusing to acknowledge differences to respecting them

batferret:

That artist feel when

image

"shit that’s not right, let’s try again"

image

"FUCK"

biitumen:

Dilation and constriction of these organelles, called chromatophores, are responsible for the squid’s ability to change color.

Inside Nature’s Giants: The Giant Squid (2010)

politicalsexkitten:

imdeanbytheway:

robotsandfrippary:

earthlyghost:

mormondad:

melancholic-fangirl:

southern-conservatism:

drugsound:

Government is good.

Big Brother is watching you.

The State wants to take care of you.

north Korea scares me to death. the fact that a place like that still exists in modern day. those people are prisoners.

1984 is here and now

this is too 1984 to be real

why the fuck have i barely heard anything about this shit? Why aren’t more people outraged about this? and talking about this? this is fucking horrible! Something has to be done it’s fucking 2014 why the fuck is this even happening

i have family in North Korea that no one has seen since the war.

Why isn’t anyone telling us about this?
I’m a sophomore in high school. Who gives a shit about The Second Great Awakening? What about this? What about the Korean Reich that’s strangling it’s own people? Why hasn’t anyone at least pretended to care? Fuck Beyoncé, fuck whatever is coming soon to theaters. Why isn’t the suffering of human beings the first headline in the NY Times? Why hasn’t my history teacher taken a moment out of the 53 minutes in our class to inform us? Why?

Why?

I’m case anyone is interested, this documentary is from National Geographic: Inside North Korea. It’s on Netflix and of definitely recommend it.

Lisa Ling travels to North Korea to document all of this and it’s terrifying.

This totalitarian government is some fucked dystopia you’d think about in novels but is currently happening right now.

They interviewed someone who ran away to China, and how his family will be living in those camps because of his actions.

It’s only about an hour long, so please give it a watch.

shuckl:

4chan users think they’re like vikings or whatever when ‘raiding’ websites but it’s more like in that avril lavigne video where she says “do you guys wanna crash the mall” and everyone’s like hell yeah!